Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Disassembling and Decolonizing School in the Pacific: A Genealogy from Micronesia file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Disassembling and Decolonizing School in the Pacific: A Genealogy from Micronesia book. Happy reading Disassembling and Decolonizing School in the Pacific: A Genealogy from Micronesia Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Disassembling and Decolonizing School in the Pacific: A Genealogy from Micronesia at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Disassembling and Decolonizing School in the Pacific: A Genealogy from Micronesia Pocket Guide.

In this volume, an international panel of experts in the fields of medicine, law, ethics, anthropology, sociology, history, religion, and politics, thoroughly examine this violation of human rights and correct widely held medical misinformation. In this volume, an international panel of experts in the fields of medicine, law, ethics, This book discusses ethnography from the three points of view of emerging methodologies, practice and advocacy, and social justice and transformation.

Systemwide Events Calendar

It provides an up-to-date examination of ethnographic practices and methodologies. This book discusses ethnography from the three points of view of emerging methodologies, practice This book examines how each of the major regions of the world is likely to be affected by changes in the environment and migration in the coming years.

A Laboratory Guide to Human Physiology, Concepts and Clinical Applications

Each chapter is written by leading experts of the region, on the basis of a unified framework. This book examines how each of the major regions of the world is likely to be affected by changes in Strongly focused on practical solutions in mental health care for refugees and forced migrants, this welcome addition to the literature is an interdisciplinary evaluation of the social and psychological resources fostering resilience in the face of adversity.

Strongly focused on practical solutions in mental health care for refugees and forced migrants, this This book offers innovative insights on South—South human mobility. It features a collection of papers that highlight often overlooked mobility patterns among and within regions in the global South as well as address critical realities faced by South-South migrants.

This publication thoroughly investigates key issues of the migration debate, It features a collection of Toggle navigation. New to eBooks. In Micronesia, public school and the process of schooling has become one of the most prominent governmental apparatuses that governs the lived-experience of Micronesian students. According to Kupferman, this exercise of power limits the conditions of possibility and being for Micronesian students. Another example of how Kupferman genealogically traces the normalization of school and schooling is the construction of the teacher through acts of development volunteering.

He begins by inverting his own experience of teaching in Saipan in the Northern Mariana islands. Since I share a similar experience of having travelled to the Federated States of Micronesia to teach in Chuuk for a year, I find Kupfermans critical deconstruction of the teacher fascinating, useful, and reflective of my own processes of deconstruction. Kupferman first encountered Micronesia having recently graduated from college at age 22, teaching high school algebra and geometry in Saipan.

As he points out, the subjects he taught alone are puzzling because his bachelors degree is in history, politics, and government. Similarly, I taught high school English literature although my degree is in sociology and sustainable community development.

boylilenrolasum.tk

Review of "Disassembling and Decolonizing School in the Pacific: A Genealogy from Micronesia"

Kupferman iterates the fact that it would be immensely difficult, and near impossible, for a year-old native of a Micronesian island group, with less than a year of work experience out of college, to land a high school teaching job in any American school district.

Many volunteer groups and organizations work in the islands, but for the purposes of his study, Kupferman focuses on those that have a primary emphasis on teaching. One organization that Kupferman discusses is WorldTeach. Whats more, WorldTeach connects with the national ministries of education in the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the Federated States of Micronesia, which permits WorldTeach to move administrative costs onto the host country and make volunteering affordable for the volunteer.

Kundrecensioner

Kupferman questions this arrangement because it produces teachers through a discourse that allows young, unqualified college graduates in the sense that training as a teacher in cross-cultural contexts is not required from any academic field to teach as long as they speak English. But what is more concerning is how the construction of volunteer programs circulates through development discourses and normalizes the young, Western, English-speaker as what a teacher should and can be.

Kupfermans analysis continues with autoethnographic reflection on his own narrative. After obtaining a master's degree in education and gaining years of teaching experience in the United States he returned to the region of Micronesia. In , CMI began an accreditation process to re-envision the colleges vision statement.

Recommended for you

At this point Kupferman had become the acting dean of academics and was present at all accreditation meetings. Kupferman recalls that the CMI president would begin meetings by questioning, '"What kind of college do you want? In response, Kupferman retorts, '"Do you want a college? The presidents question, Kupferman argues, assumes college to be a self-evident institution in the Marshall Islands. Asking whether or not a college is wanted in the first place challenges the notion that ontologies of education should not be questioned.

Underscoring his broader point that educational institutions have been a component of extending colonial administration in the region, Kupferman aims to formulate options for how education be done through rethinking educational institutions and processes. In other areas of the book, Kupferman explores more instances of educations normalization and narrativization of the student throughout Micronesia. In this section, Kupfermans methodology recalls Saids literary criticism in Orientalism.

He points out how the history of Lee Boo is only known and understood through British writer George Keates descriptions of the Palauan student the information of which had been relayed through Antelope ship captain Henry Wilson. Whats more, Kupferman takes on the memorialization of Lee Boo in the form of a statue outside Palau Community College. Here Kupferman borrows from Baudrillard and theorizes the statue as simulacrum, a monument intended to universalize.

As it is, the statue of Lee Boo is white and in the dress of an ideal Enlightenment era male. Elsewhere, Kupferman provides a deconstructive reading of a travelogue written by a former WorldTeach volunteer in the Marshall Islands. In this section Kupferman shows how the author of the travelogue uses racialized language to string together descriptions of his Marshallese students as purely physical and animalistic beings.

Despite the construction of the volunteer teacher as an ideal type of expert, the travelogue writer goes on to admit that he had no experience to draw upon in his classroom to teach lessons. He was, in fact, relieved that he was teaching at a bad school, allowing him to assume that locals would hold him to a lower standard. In this example, Kupferman strikingly shows how the teacher is an apparatus of power that functions on difference and othering. When applied in other contexts, Kupfermans analysis might also be transposed to demonstrate how such processes continually transform other institutions in Micronesia such as government and family.

Kupferman makes a good argument for how theory is one of the greatest tools we have to analyze the very real effects of development discourses on peoples lives. He also makes good use of theory itself, and his own theorizing adds much to debates on decoloniality and decolonization. However, it would have been beneficial to see Kupferman make use of some theory outside the Western canon.

I realize that this point may fall into the binaries of positionality which he critiques, but there is much to be missed by not digging deeper into indigenous theoretical critiques as well. Kupfermans methodological approach is often based. Data from interviews or participant observations in schools might tell us even more about the nature of education and decolonization in Micronesia. It would also allow a discursive space from which participants could become co-authors in research with Kupferman. Browse Ethnology. Social and cultural anthropology Subcategories.

Filter Results. Last 30 days. Last 90 days. All time.

English Only. Demographic Research Monographs Series. Add to Cart Add to Cart. Add to Wishlist Add to Wishlist. View More.


  • Copyright:.
  • Julius Caesar (Ancient World Leaders).
  • Ethnology. Social and cultural anthropology.

Springer Netherlands Denniston , Frederick M. Hodges and 1 more Rinehart , Karen N. Barbour and 1 more